WRITERS' LEAGUE OF TEXAS-How to Turn a Mess of Pages Into a Book

Thursday, October 19 at 7PM


WRITERS' LEAGUE OF TEXAS 
PRESENTS
How to Turn a Mess of Pages Into a Book

 

On the Third Floor of BookPeople

 


ABOUT HOW TO TURN A MESS OF PAGES INTO A BOOK

First drafts of novels and memoirs can begin with a spark of an idea and a rush of enthusiasm. But after 70-100 pages, that initial clarity often vanishes, along with any sense of the way forward into the book. Or perhaps you're researching for a nonfiction project, but you feel lost at the thought of organizing your notes into a coherent narrative.

This panel will discuss strategies for shaping early drafts of book-length projects and giving them direction—a must-attend event for anyone who has recently thrown themselves into a new project or wants to return to a memoir or nonfiction draft that they've put aside.


ABOUT DALIA AZIM

Dalia Azim's stories and essays have appeared in American Short FictionGlimmer TrainApertureOther VoicesPindeldyboz, and Columbia Journal, among other places. She has been a recipient of Glimmer Train's Short Story Award for New Writers and is perpetually at work—and nearing completion—on her first novel. She lives in Austin, Texas, with her family and is the manager of special projects at the Blanton Museum of Art


ABOUT ALISON MACOR

Alison Macor is the author of Rewrite Man: The Life and Career of Screenwriter Warren Skaaren and the award-winning Chainsaws, Slackers, and Spy Kids: Thirty Years of Filmmaking in Austin, Texas. She’s also a freelance writer and former film critic for The Austin Chronicle and the Austin American-Statesman. She holds a Ph.D. in Radio-TV-Film from the University of Texas at Austin and has taught film courses at the University of Texas, Austin Community College, and the Austin Museum of Art.


ABOUT CORY PUTMAN OAKES

Cory Putman Oakes is the author of The VeilDinosaur Boy, Dinosaur Boy Saves Mars, and Witchtown. Sometime around sixth grade, she had to face the sad truth that being a heroine in a Madeleine L'Engle book was not a valid career choice. Since then, she graduated from UCLA and Cornell Law School, worked as an associate at a big law firm, and taught at Texas State University. She finally decided that writing books was the best alternative to living in them.

 

Event date: 
Thursday, October 19, 2017 - 7:00pm
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